Category Archives: Crisis Management

Understanding and Assessing Risk through Risk Management

Risk management is an area of business that offers a firm great savings potential when making complicated decisions. The tenets of the traditional philosophy allow consultants to bring a different kind of focus to their analysis, asking them to look for areas in which a firm might be exposed to greater risk during the course of a project or process.
At Cane Bay Partners, there is a wealth of team experience working with the identification of risk factors that can then be compared to alternative options to provide a quantified experience for managers that want to optimize their company’s performance through a different lens- success.

When Does Risk Management Apply?

As consultants, risk management work for major clients comes about through their request or through our own analysis. Because there are a multiplicity of reasons that someone would want to have risk management practices applied to their specific project, there will be times where taking the first step to identify the indicators that are necessary could be better performed by contacting us first.
We can not only provide you with means-based models that help to define your environment effectively, we can also train your staff in what to look for to determine whether or not most of the apparatus used in formal risk management actually applies well to each process or project that you are considering it for.

It goes without saying that once those factors are identified, they can be measured to provide you with a detailed analyses.

Because time is money and efficiency is another hallmark of any consulting firm, answering the question ‘When does risk management apply?’ often includes discussion of the concept of ROI or Return on Investment. Cane Partners can not only provide you with risk analysis services then, but they can also build in analysis of that analysis to show you what your return on investment is for having undertaken the journey. If you are training in-house people to recognize risk, in a short amount of time, they will have developed a data set that helps provide financial impetus for doing analyses in specific situations.

Strategic Planning using Risk Management Inputs

Another area where companies traditionally can use outside input is when risk analysis meets the strategic planning process. Moving forward cannot be done without strategic planning and utilizing the know-how and experience of a team like that of Cane Partners can help bring the type of decision-making advice prowess that has been relied upon worldwide for a number of years.

So if you feel there may be a need for risk management services in the future, consider contacting Cane Partners for a consultation.

 

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Splitsville for JayZ and Beyoncé? It’s A Public Relations Dream Either Way

Is the marriage between JayZ and Beyoncé in need of help from a crisis public relations firm, or is the mega-couple using rumors of relationship trouble as a PR stunt to fuel ticket sales for their massive world tour?

Only time will tell.

Whispers of cracks in the pair’s relationship first surfaced in May when TMZ posted footage of Beyoncé’s sister, Solange Knowles, attacking JayZ in an elevator at The Standard hotel in Manhattan.

Concerns intensified after the Cincinnati stop of the couple’s “On The Run” tour in June when Beyoncé changed the lyrics of her song “Resentment” to seemingly make reference to JayZ cheating on her.

“Been ridin’ with you for 12 years. Why did I deserve to be treated this way by you?” she sang. The original lyrics are: “Been ridin’ with you for six years. Why did I deserve to be treated this way by you?”

JayZ and Beyoncé have been together for 12 years. They began dating in 2002 and married in 2008. They are parents to one child, two-year-old Blue Ivy.

The New York Post claims unnamed sources have told them JayZ and Beyoncé are seeing marriage counselors in an attempt to save their relationship, but they are no longer wearing their wedding rings and may part ways following the end of their tour.

However, experts agree that, even if JayZ and Beyoncé do call it quits, the money will keep rolling in.

“I don’t think this impacts their businesses in a major way,” public relations executive Ronn Torossian said in an interview with Entertainment Tonight. “They’re not kids. This is not, you know, Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez duking it out on Twitter and late night battles. Both JayZ and Beyoncé’s machines will continue to go on whether they’re married or they’re divorced.”

Heartbreak on the horizon or not, JayZ and Beyoncé are guaranteed to stick it out until the end of their world tour. Promoters have already fronted most of the money to the entertainers, and HBO is planning to film the last two concerts of the “On The Run” tour when it hits Paris, which doesn’t happen until September.

The tour is reportedly pulling in around $5 million per performance and is on pace to rake in $100 million for the year.

“JayZ and Beyoncé’s marriage is just as much a merger as it is a marriage,” Forbes senior editor Zach O’Malley Greenburg told ET.

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Filed under Crisis Management, Public Relations, Social Media, Technology

Bitter pill – California Counties Sue Drug Companies

health-care-public-relationsIt may be one of the most necessary “unfair” questions ever asked in a courtroom, and it certainly has people lining up on both sides of the issue. Are drug makers responsible for the “epidemic” of prescription painkiller abuse? This situation is causing quite a Healthcare PR uproar.

 According to a report in Bloomberg Businessweek, Orange and Santa Clara counties in California have filed a suit alleging that pharmaceutical companies intentionally set out to turn rarely prescribed painkillers into “commonplace remedies.” The companies, according to the suit, downplayed the risk of addiction, and promoted the benefits of “chronic relief.”The suit goes on to allege that the drug companies intentionally deceived consumers, and even tried to undermine and reverse the common medical understanding of opioid drugs.

 Both sides of the argument understand full well that this case will reach well beyond the courtroom. With expected wall to wall news coverage, the consumer PR angle is vitally important. Many people already suspect they are being treated more like consumers than patients. To find out it is literally true would create a firestorm of backlash. Whether or not the California counties “win” the case or the drug companies in question have to pay any sort of penalties, there will be an extensive and very public conversation about this case. And, whether or not the drug companies are found liable in the court, they will be held to account in the court of public opinion. Of course, they knew this, and are likely prepared, but it will be interesting to see how and when each side releases PR in an attempt to control the public opinion conversation.

 There is no doubt that this fight will get ugly, and that both sides will end up playing both offense and defense. Motives will be loudly questioned, and accusations will be leveled. Should be interesting – and informative – to watch it all unfold.

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Filed under Corporations, Crisis Management, Media, Public Relations

When You Can Make the News Your Story, You Master Public Relations

Starbuck’s cups say “Come Together”

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz demonstrated marketing genius this week.  He took his common drink of choice for millions of Americans and turned it into the news of the day.

The biggest obstacle to generating consistent publicity for any brand is the often aggressive attack of current events that consumes the media. When war in Israel breaks out or a massacre at a shopping mall or school occurs, news channels develop heartfelt collages choreographed to a stirring musical theme to begin and end each commercial break and that item becomes the only news angle of the day, week or even month.  Take the fiscal cliff, and see how Starbucks made it their story.  (Read more here)

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Filed under Creative Writing, Crisis Management, Media, News and Views, Politics

Juda Engelmayer of HerldPR on CBS about Lance Armstrong’s Brand and Crisis

Juda Engelmayer of HeraldPR on CBS about Lance Armstrong’s Brand and Crisis.  Amidst the doping scandal, Armstrong lost many of his key endorsement deals.  Can his brand be rebuilt and what will it take?

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Filed under Crisis Management, Lance Armstrong, Social Media, Sports, Video

What is George Zimmerman Thinking?

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opednews.com

 In invoking the “God’s plan” message, George Zimmerman and his team of public relations specialists made a critical decision.  The man who shot and killed the unarmed youth Treyvon Martin in Sanford, Florida offered an exclusive interview to Fox News’ Sean Hannity and expressed little remorse while telling America that the events leading to, and Martin’s death were part of God’s plan.  What he did do was attempt to draw support from a different direction; the usually right leaning Christian groups, who are also often strong supporters of the Second Amendment.
The natural support base for Martin comes from the African American communities, and the fact that Al Sharpton took up the cause reinforces the image of the civil rights agenda, black versus white, and the underprivileged versus the middle and upper class.  Martin’s cause became known and big, getting all the way up to the President of the United States’ bully pulpit, and millions on the left rallied behind the boy’s family seeking justice for Treyvon.  Then came the pictures of Zimmerman walking through the police station, some had him looking uninjured and others showed him with a few band-aids on his head questioned Zimmerman’s version of events that fateful night. (Continue Reading)
Juda Engelmayer is President and Partner with the NY PR agency, HeraldPR

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Filed under Crisis Management, Politics, Religion

Did Exremism Cause the Fall of the Second Temple?

Shammai Engelmayer • Columns

Published: 06 July 2012

The Three Weeks begin this evening, and with them once again comes the question of why Jerusalem was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE. The standard answer is this: Jerusalem was destroyed because of the sin of “baseless hatred” (sinat chinam); the Talmud says so, so it must be true.

But the Talmud does not say so. Sinat chinam was a contributing factor, but extremism was the cause.

Actually, the Talmud offers many reasons for why Jerusalem was destroyed. In the Babylonian Talmud tractate Shabbat (119b), for example, there are several from which to choose. Among them are that “Shabbat was desecrated there,” “Jerusalemites neglected reading the Shema,” they “neglected [the education of] school children,” acted without concern for how their actions looked to others, acted as though those among them who were the most ignorant of the law were the equals of those who were most knowledgeable, “closed their eyes to the evil around them and did nothing,” and because “scholars there were despised by the general population.”

BT Yoma (9b) offers different possibilities, including sinat chinam, which is by far the most popular one: “But the second Temple… why was it destroyed? Because there existed there sinat chinam. That is meant to teach you that baseless hatred is considered even worse [a sin] than the three sins of idolatry, sexual immorality, and bloodshed combined.”

What is absent in Yoma, however, is what is meant by “baseless hatred.” For that, we must turn to BT Gittin (55b-56a) and the infamous tale of Kamtza and Bar Kamtza, which is used as the prooftext that sinat chinam was the cause of Jerusalem’s destruction and our exile. There is only one problem: The text makes no such claim. Those who cite it either have never studied the text, or deliberately cut off the tale at its knees to distort its true — and unwanted — message.

“The destruction of Jerusalem came through a certain Kamtza and a Bar Kamtza in this way,” Rabbi Yochanan explains in the text. “A certain man had a friend named Kamtza and an enemy named Bar Kamtza. He once made a party and said to his servant, ‘Go and bring me Kamtza.’ The man went and brought him Bar Kamtza instead. When the [host] found [Bar Kamtza] there, he said, ‘Behold, you are the one who tells stories about me. Why are you here? Leave.’ Said [Bar Kamtza to the host]: ‘Since I am already here, let me stay, and I will pay you for whatever I eat and drink.’”

The host said no, and all the efforts of Bar Kamtza to avoid being embarrassed proved futile. He even offered to pay for the whole party, but the host literally dragged him to the street, while all of Jerusalem’s elite reportedly stood by in silence.

“Said [Bar Kamtza], ‘Since there were rabbis sitting there and [they] did not stop him [from behaving so boorishly], I understand from this that they agreed with him. I will go to the [Roman] government and inform on them.’”

Thus, according to the testimony of Bar Kamtza, the reason for his perfidy was the silence of the rabbis, not the animosity shown to him by the anonymous host. That animosity, in fact, may not have been baseless, at all. The host cites his reason: that Bar Kamtza spread tales about him, presumably of an evil nature. Bar Kamtza does not deny the charge. Rather, he pleads not to be embarrassed in front of Jerusalem’s elite.

The story, however, is not over. Rabbi Yochanan has more to say:

“[Bar Kamtza] went and said to [the local governor, personal representative of] Caesar, ‘The Jews are rebelling against you.’ [The Roman] said, ‘How can I tell?’ Said Bar Kamtza to him: ‘Send them an offering and see whether they will offer it [on the altar].’”

Bar Kamtza, of course, had a plan. He knew that the Romans would choose a calf for the offering that was ritually acceptable. He would then see to it that the animal would not be acceptable once it arrived at the Temple. “While on the way,” said Rabbi Yochanan, Bar Kamtza “made a blemish on its upper lip, or some say that it was on the white of its eye, in a place where according to our way of thinking it is a blemish [thereby rendering the calf ineligible as a sacrifice], but according to [the Roman] way of looking at it, it is not [considered a blemish].”

Now Rabbi Yochanan gets to his point: The rabbis were prepared to allow the offering “in order to keep peace with the government,” but a rabbi named Zechariah ben Avkulas insisted that the law be followed to the letter.

And so it was. Said Rabbi Yochanan: “Because of the humility of Rabbi Zechariah ben Avkulas, our House was destroyed, our Temple burnt, and we ourselves exiled from our land.”

For “humility,” read “extremism.” Rabbi Yochanan’s point is clear: Jerusalem was razed and the Temple set afire because one rabbi insisted that God’s law was immutable and uncompromising, and the consequences be damned.

The true lesson of Kamtza and Bar Kamtza, and the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, is that consequences must be considered. If God was the ultimate author of the calamities of 70 C.E., then it was God Himself who rejected following a strict interpretation of halachah in the face of impending disaster. It was He who punished His people for not allowing a more liberal interpretation of the law to hold sway long enough to avert disaster.

Sometimes, God was saying, religious authorities must set aside their aversion to compromise. When the fate of the People Israel is at stake, they must be more accepting of other views and must be more honest in admitting that their views may not be the only ones that will please God. They can hold to their views, but they must neither demonize nor delegitimate those who think differently.

Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of the Conservative synagogue Temple Israel Community Center in Cliffside Park and an instructor in the UJA-Federation-sponsored Florence Melton Adult Mini-School of the Hebrew University. He is the editor of Judaism: A Journal of Jewish Life and Thought.  This article was originally printed in the Jewish Standard of NJ.

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Filed under Crisis Management, Education, Judasim, Religion